si vis pacem, para bellum
Tony
Future Marine
si vis pacem, para bellum
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Standing Guard
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Scream that Motivation
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parrisisland:

131214-M-PG802-118 on Flickr.
Tears trickle down the face of Rct. Timothy Warren, Platoon 1096, Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, as his senior drill instructor hands him his Eagle, Globe and Anchor emblem during a ceremony Dec. 14, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. This ceremony marked the end of the arduous 54-hour culminating event of training known as the Crucible, during which recruits such as Warren, an 18-year-old native of Jacksonville Beach, Fla., demonstrated his acceptance and usage of the Marine Corps’ core values of honor, courage and commitment. The Crucible ends at the Iwo Jima flag raising statue, where drill instructors present their recruits with Eagle, Globe and Anchor emblems and call them Marines for the first time. Delta Company is scheduled to graduate Dec. 20, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. MaryAnn Hill)
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peerintothepast:

Pure Inspiration by United States Marine Corps Official Page on Flickr.
Sgt. Justin Glenn Burnside motivates a recruit with Echo Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. Burnside, originally a signal intelligence specialist from Bristol Fla., is one of about 600 drill instructors who shape the approximately 20,000 recruits through Parris Island annually into United States Marines. This handful of dedicated DIs is entrusted with sustaining a more than 237-year legacy. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. David Bessey)
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#usmc #marines #Drill Instructor #boot camp 
I Am Not Afraid of Storms: Suuuure, I haven’t enlisted yet.And, what? Keep talking down on me...
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semperannoying:

U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Kyle Clements, a military policeman assigned to Afghan National Civil Order Police (ANCOP) Advisory Team, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, conducts pre-combat inspections on his vehicle prior to a mounted patrol on Forward Operating Base Now Zad, Helmand province, Afghanistan, Dec. 16, 2012. The advisory team worked and trained with the ANCOP to improve security operations and stability in the district. 
(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Alejandro Pena/Released)